Disney Getaway

The Blogorail: Original Magic Kingdom Attractions

Welcome to this month’s Blogorail Orange Loop. Today we are sharing vintage Disney attractions and entertainment and a little Disney history.


Magic Kingdom Attractions

Cinderella Castle stands watch over the Magic Kingdom!

Original Magic Kingdom Attractions

Hello everyone, and thank you for joining us today as we explore some vintage Disney on the Magical Blogorail Orange Loop!  In my post today, I’m writing about my favorite Original Magic Kingdom Attractions.  Have a look at my list, and let me know how my list compares with your list!

1) Peter Pan’s Flight

Magic Kingdom Attractions

At the top of our favorite Original Attractions is Peter Pan’s Flight!

Our family loves Peter Pan’s Flight!  It’s such a fun journey; as I said in a different post, when you enter the Magic Kingdom, it’s like you leave Florida, but when you enter Peter Pan’s Flight, it’s like you have totally left the Magic Kingdom behind. It’s that immersive. With Disney’s incredible use of forced perspective, you really do feel like you are traveling above the streets of London, and that you have left Wendy’s bedroom behind.

2) Haunted Mansion

Magic Kingdom Attractions

The Haunted Mansion is one of Mike’s Favorites!

Another of my favorite Magic Kingdom Original Attractions is the Haunted Mansion.  Like Peter Pan’s Flight, this attraction makes use of an Omnimover system for loading and unloading Guests into the attraction.  There are some subtle (and also not so subtle) differences between the version in Liberty Square and the one located in Disneyland at New Orlean’s Square, but the premise is the same; who wants to be that 1,000th Happy Haunt? On a former post, we talked about where we would like to spend the night at the Magic Kingdom; for my wife, it was in the Haunted Mansion.

3) it’s a small world

Magic Kingdom Attractions

Located across the path from Peter Pan’s Flight, it’s a small world makes our list!

As many of you already know, I’m sure, part of what makes “it’s a small world” special is the fact that it was originally on display at the 1964 World Fair in New York City. In addition, this attraction is just one of those attractions that I love because it automatically makes me happy.  I sing the song, over and over again, I look at the decorations, I take pictures of hundreds of things, and I wave at the Cast Member who starts us on our journey.  When I was a kid, I remember my Grandpa and I sitting in Pinocchio Village Haus by the windows that overlook the attraction, waving at boat after boat, and having them wave back at us. That’s a memory that I will never forget.

4) The Walt Disney World Railroad

Magic Kingdom Attractions

The Roger E. Broggie is just one of the locomotives on the Walt Disney World Railroad!

Perhaps as a surprise to some of you (or perhaps not to my long term readers), the Walt Disney World Railroad is number 4 in our list of favorite Original Magic Kingdom Attractions.  I’ve had a fascination with trains my entire life, starting with my first train layout I was given for Christmas as a child, and continuing on to now with the trains I have here at the house. What makes the Walt Disney World Railroad so special to me, though, is the nostalgia of it all; the ability to just travel through time to when railroad travel was much more common, and to be able to see a side of Disney that one doesn’t often see.

5) The Jungle Cruise

Magic Kingdom Attractions

The Gorillas have taken over the Jungle Cruise!

Rounding out our top five is The Jungle Cruise, that one of a kind attraction that has a cult following.  What I love about the Jungle Cruise is how corny the jokes are! Also, I love the history of the attraction, more so from the Disneyland perspective than the Walt Disney World perspective, but I like the history at the Magic Kingdom nonetheless.

So there you have it, my top five Magic Kingdom original attractions!  Where does my list stack up against your list? Let me know in the comments, please, and thanks for stopping by today! Now, go check out the rest of the great posts my friends on the Blogorail have written for you!

For more vintage Disney,
check out the other great posts from the Blogorail!


Here is the map of our Magical Blogorail Orange | Vintage Disney Loop:

Museum Park

On the Road at the NC Museum of Art

NC Museum of Art

The West Building of the North Carolina Museum of Art. Image Credit: On the Road with Mickey.

On the Road at the NC Museum of Art

By Mike Ellis.

Yesterday we talked about the Museum Park that exists on the grounds of the North Carolina Museum of Art; today, we continue our look at this museum by exploring the museum itself, and tomorrow, to wrap up our look at this great museum, we are going to talk about the special exhibit that is wrapping up soon, featuring works of M. C. Escher and Leonardo Da Vinci.

The NC Museum of Art features two buildings; the West Building and the East Building.  East Building is where the special exhibits are featured, and where the Escher and Da Vinci exhibits are housed.  Today, Cindy and I explored the West Building, which is home to the permanent collection.  I don’t know exactly how big it is in terms of square footage, but it houses a large collection of paintings, sculptures, and more, including the tranquil Rodin Garden.  At just two miles from my house, the Museum of Art is conveniently located to be able to get over for a visit almost any time.

Background History

In 1947 the state legislature appropriated $1 million to purchase a collection of art for the people of North Carolina. The appropriation, which was unheard of at the time and drew national attention, was in response to a then-anonymous challenge grant from noted philanthropist Samuel H. Kress of New York through the persuasive efforts of Robert Lee Humber. Humber was an international lawyer and native of Greenville, N.C.

Humber worked tirelessly with the legislature to ensure the bill’s passage. An amended bill was finally passed in the waning hours of the last day of the legislative session. Rep. John Kerr of Warren County, in support of the bill, famously said, “Mr. Speaker, I know I am facing a hostile audience, but man cannot live by bread alone.”

The initial $1 million legislative appropriation was used to purchase 139 European and American paintings and sculptures.

The Kress Foundation matched the $1 million appropriation with a gift of 70 works of art, primarily Italian Renaissance, adding the Museum to its program of endowing regional museums throughout the United States with works from the Kress Collection. The Kress gift to the Museum became the largest and most important of any except that given to the National Gallery of Art. The Museum’s original collection, along with the Kress gift, established the North Carolina Museum of Art as one of the premier art museums. (NCMA)

Until today, I had no idea that North Carolina’s art heritage went back that far, or that the State had such an early attention towards the arts.  That in and of itself is pretty cool to me.  What follows is some of the pieces that I enjoyed the most, I hope you like them, and that it is a driving force towards getting you over to the Museum on a visit of your own one day!

NC Museum of Art

Lines that Link Humanity, El Anatsui, 2008

 

NC Museum of Art

Indian Fantasy, Marsden Hartley, 1914

 

A201 Ribat, Jackie Ferrara, 1979.

A201 Ribat, Jackie Ferrara, 1979.

 

Tar Baby vs. St. Sebastian, Michael Richards, 1999.

Tar Baby vs. St. Sebastian, Michael Richards, 1999.

 

Untitled, Kay Hassan, 2013

Untitled, Kay Hassan, 2013

 

Egungun Costume, Artist Unknown, 20th Century.

Egungun Costume, Artist Unknown, 20th Century.

 

NC Museum of Art

Coffin of Amunred, Egyptian, Possibly from Heracleopolis, Third Intermediate – Late Period Dynasty 25-26, circa 715-525 B.C.E.

 

Inner Coffin of Djedmut, Egyptian, possibly from Thebes, Third Intermediate - Late Period Dynasty 25-26, circa 715-525 B.C.E.

Inner Coffin of Djedmut, Egyptian, possibly from Thebes, Third Intermediate – Late Period Dynasty 25-26, circa 715-525 B.C.E.

 

NC Museum of Art

Sawfish Headdress, Artist Unknown, 20th Century

NC Museum of Art

 

NC Museum of Art

The Kiss, Auguste Rodin, Modeled circa 1881-1882, cast later.

 

NC Museum of Art

Part of the Rodin Garden, a tranquil setting outside the NC Museum of Art.

 

NC Museum of Art

The Eruption of Mt. Vesuvius, Pierre-Jacques Volaire, 1777

 

NC Museum of Art

St. John the Baptist, Jusepe de Ribera, circa 1624.

I hope you have liked exploring the NC Museum of Art with me.  There is a lot to see and do here, and it is well worth your effort to make the trip if you are a local or in the area.  Have you been to the Art Museum? Tell me, what did you think of it?  Let me know in the comments, and thanks for stopping by!

 

Happy 40th Birthday Carousel of Progress!

Carousel of Progress

Walt Disney’s Carousel of Progress celebrates it’s 40th anniversary today, January 15, 2015, at the Magic Kingdom.

On January 15, 1975, Walt Disney’s Carousel of Progress opened in Tomorrowland at the Magic Kingdom park at Walt Disney World, along with some Mountain of Space.  The Carousel of Progress, or COP as Disney Cast Members sometimes refer to it, is a special attraction for me because it is the same attraction that was on display at the 1964-65 New York World’s Fair.  This attraction was the brainchild of Walt Disney, and after the World’s Fair, was transported across the country to Disneyland before making the trek back across country to the Magic Kingdom.

What I really enjoy about the Carousel of Progress is that it takes us back in time, while at the same time giving us a glimpse of the future — or at least, a version of the future that some would say is here today.  It’s that trip back, though, that I truly enjoy — looking at how houses operated back in the day, thinking about what it took to live, and to enjoy life, and focusing on the history of it all — I think that is why it is among my favorite attractions.

Knowing that Walt Disney was a lover of history, I see so much of his influence in the attraction, and that is another reason why I enjoy it like I do.  Carousel of Progress is both simple and technologically advanced all at the same time.  How many theaters have you been in where the seats rotate around the sets?

One of the scenes from the Carousel of Progress.

One of the scenes from the Carousel of Progress.

Carousel of Progress incorporates the use of Audio-Animatronics in it’s characters, and that technology is just another example of one of the incredible marvels that Disney has brought to their theme parks.  The attention to detail is remarkable, as you can see in the shot showing how the wiring was all connected and strung out from the light fixture.

Walt Disney’s Carousel of Progress is well deserving of it’s anniversary this day, and I hope that it is around for another 40 years.  What do you think about the attraction?  Like it, love it, hate it, want to see it updated, or don’t care?  Whatever your thoughts, I’d love to hear them, so please, let us know what you think in the comments section below.  Thanks, everyone, and have a great day!

#DisneyMovieMonday – Steamboat Willie

Image ©TheWaltDisneyCompany.com

Image ©TheWaltDisneyCompany.com

 

Hello everyone, and welcome to a special #DisneyMusicMonday.  Today also happens to be the 4th anniversary of when I started My Dreams of Disney, so on this day, I’m sharing with you a video that really was the start of it all for so many of us in this business.

On November 18, 1928, Mickey Mouse stars in Steamboat Willie, the first commercially successful animated cartoon to use synchronized sound. Disney’s third Mickey short (but the first with sound) debuts as a sneak preview at Universal’s Colony Theatre – located at Broadway & 53rd Street in New York City. It is shown before the feature film Gang War. Steamboat Willie is co-directed by Walt Disney and Ub Iwerks and features the first appearance of Minnie Mouse. It is animated by Ub Iwerks, Wilfred Jackson and Dick Lundy. The short also features the work of inbetween artist Les Clark (who will go on to be one of “Walt’s Nine Old Men”). Walt himself supplies the voices for all the characters – although there isn’t any real spoken dialogue just whistling, grunts, laughter and other vocal sounds. Walt sits nervously at the rear of the theater to gage the audience’s reaction. To his delight, the Colony echoes with laughs and giggles throughout the short! Steamboat Willie will be shown every night for 2 weeks. (Despite the fact that this is not the first Mickey cartoon made or released, it is still considered Mickey Mouse’s true debut … and birthday!)

It’s not every day that we celebrate an anniversary for our blog, and I never imagined that my little blog would grow into the site that it is — or that it would even be still around after four years!  Our first post (and posts) were written as recaps of the memories that I have from my original visits to Walt Disney World, but as the months went by, our posts became more about reviews, and lists of favorites, dining reviews, and so on.  It’s crazy to imagine that we have published 1,513 posts now (with this being number 1,513)!  Well, enough about the blog — today is #DisneyMusicMonday, and I’ve got two videos to share with you — the first is the intro music for Walt Disney Animation Studios, and the second is the actual Steamboat Willie cartoon.  I hope you have time to enjoy both of them, and don’t forget to check out the rest of the posts below.  Also, special thanks as always to my friend Tim from Dad for Disney for co-hosting with me!

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Plane Crazy

Tiggerific Trivia – Plane Crazy

Plane Crazy

March 17, 1929 — Plane Crazy is re-released, this time with sound!

Hello everyone, and welcome to this week’s #DisneyTrivia post! Today we are taking a look at the re-release of an original Mickey Mouse cartoon — the incredible Plane Crazy!

Did You Know…

That on March 17, 1929, The Disney Mickey Mouse short Plane Crazy – now with sound – premieres at the Mark Strand Theater in New York City? As most of you will already know, Plane Crazy was actually the first short that featured Mickey & Minnie Mouse! However, it was released without sound, and as a result, didn’t do very well. Then, Steamboat Willie was released with sound, Mickey Mouse and Minnie Mouse were “born”, and after that, they added sound to Plane Crazy and released it on this day 85 years ago!

For all of you Disney history buffs, please take a moment and enjoy the YouTube version of the Disney short, in which you’ll find that Mickey wasn’t always as gentlemanly back then as he is now!  Enjoy!

Now please go check out the rest of the great entries from my friends Jodi from Magical Mouse Schoolhouse, Jenn from Disney Babies Blog, and Heidi from Heidi’s Head!

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