Walt Disney’s Cinderella Special Edition DVD Gift Set

I’d like to start by saying that the promises of Blu-ray have been overstated and under-realized. The claim of better picture quality and sound along with increased storage capacity were supposed to bring a whole new world to home entertainment.

The reality has been a marginal increase in presentation quality and, in most cases, less extras than we previously enjoyed on DVD. Much less if you compare today’s Blu-ray releases with yesterday’s Platinum 2-disc DVD Editions! And as you will see in this post, there simply is no comparison when you look at the Collector’s DVD Gift Sets:

Cinderella Collector’s DVD Gift Set

  • 2-disc Special Edition DVD (Platinum Edition)
  • 8 Exclusive Character Portraits
  • Collector Book
  • Film Frame from the movie

I have three of these Disney collectible DVD sets and I continue to be amazed at the value they yield. Let’s start with the Platinum Edition DVD:

Remember when the DVD case came in a cardboard sleeve with an opening cover? Remember that once you opened the DVD, you found a booklet inside describing what was on the discs, with navigational flow charts? Remember when ‘hours of extras’ meant hours of extras, not just 2 hours, if you were lucky? Then you remember the Platinum series of DVD’s!

The gift sets gave you this version of the DVD along with exclusive extras, like:

    

A Dream Come True ‘making of’ Storybook

As you can see from the picture above right, the illustrations in this publication are amazing! You’ll also find behind-the-scenes pictures and stories of production.

Next, this set has something truly special:

Film Frame: Cinderella on the staircase

But wait, that’s not all! You also get:

 

 

 

 

8 Exclusive Character Portraits by:

Ollie Johnston and Andre Deja

This set sold for upwards of $50.00 CAN when it first came out, and they are hard to find today, even on eBay. And when you do, the price is usually quite high. I’m glad I picked this up when I did!

So the next time you hear a commercial extolling the virtues of Blu-ray, remember this post, and the great Platinum DVD and Collector’s Gift Sets of yesterday.

Book Review: Disney-Pixar Comics Treasury

I was going to be away from home for a while and wanted something to take with me to read. So I went to my local Chapters and found this book in the discount section:

    

HarperCollins Publishers Inc. 2014

It contains 14 adaptions of the Pixar films with 1 extra bonus story involving Wall-E. I’ve read about half so far and have found a pattern developing, even though different writers are responsible for some of the titles.

         

Being as I know the stories inside-out, I can follow the edited versions presented in the book reasonably well. But for first-time readers, many panels would not make sense, as crucial details are left out. It is obvious that these adaptions were not penned by seasoned comic book writers, individuals with a consummate knowledge of conveying a bigger story into the sometimes limiting space of comic book boxes.

         

Now is as good a time as any to mention the bonus story entitled Wall-E: Recharge. As you would expect, there is no dialogue to help you understand what is happening, and because of the aforementioned inexperience of the writers with this medium the story is all-but incomprehensible!

         

The best part of this treasury is the artwork! Every artist brought a great sense of the original story to each title with some truly breath-taking visuals. As a comic book fan from way back, this was a treat to read based only on the pictures (yup, I’m a picture guy).

         

Not to be too tough on this treasury, it’s still a fun read with good work done by all of the creative talent involved. I would definitely recommend it to any Disney parent who would like a nice book of bedtime stories to share with their little Disney fans-to-be!

    

Mickey Mouse Club Push’em Car (Laundry Cart)

But just what is a PUSH’EM CAR?

I saw this in a small town antique shop years ago. It’s approximately 16″ x 24″ and the artwork is painted onto a masonite-type board. It has eight holes drilled around the edges and displays the Walt Disney Productions trademark, which dates it before 1987.

I didn’t know if it was an advertising board that would have been displayed in a store to sell some kind of pedal car, or if a Push’em Car was something that appeared on the original Mickey Mouse Club television show. The price was a little high, but I was able to get it down a little, but I still feel I paid too much. But it looked cool, so I took a chance.

Sometimes you win and sometimes you lose when you take a chance on something like this, and this time… I lost!

After researching on the Internet, I found that a Push’em Car was a mobile toy chest. It had two of these boards, one on each long side, and two other boards half the length on the ends, creating a rectangle-shaped box on wheels. The boards were screwed onto metal framing. It stood 22″ high at the top of the handles:

This was offered for auction with a starting bid of $25.00 in 2008

Final sale price not known, but estimated value is between $50 – $125.00

So as I only have one of the boards, it is pretty much valueless except for curiosity sake.

Why should I have known better? First, if it were an advertisement for a toy or pedal car, the product would have been pictured on the board. Second, no sign board would be affixed to a wall in a store with eight screws, thus damaging the wall for what would probably be a temporary promotion. I’m a more seasoned collector now, and I can truthfully say that making mistakes like this one has made me a more successful buyer!

That said… I love this board! I have it hanging in my solarium where I can look at it every morning while I drink my coffee. So not a complete fail, I guess.

Drawing Instructions for Goofy in Just Fifteen Easy Steps

I bought a folder that said ‘Art of Animation’ and was delighted to find this model sheet inside showing how to draw my favorite anamorphic dog, Goofy. So let’s start drawing:

Heyuck!

I also found these two sheets of Fun Facts about animation and Disney Animators. They’re a great piece of ephemera and so I’m happy to get the chance to share them with you:

    

Enlarge and enjoy!

OUTLAND Comic Strip featuring Mortimer Mouse

In the immortal words of Monty Python: “And now for something completely different.” In other words, if you’re easily offended, please scroll down to an older post (actually, it’s not that bad!)

One of my hobbies as a self-professed Amateur Disney Historian is to find odd bits of Disney minutia wherever they may be found. And in whatever form they may take. Even if that form is a little… out there:

Does anyone remember Opus, the puffin?

How about Bill, the cat? These characters are well known (in some circles) for their political satire and biting commentary on… just about everything. So it isn’t surprising that Disney would come into the crosshairs, which it does in the first collection of the Outland comic strip:

    

The Mortimer Mouse story (sort of)

The joke is that Disney is going to sue Outland for using Mickey Mouse without permission, so these two pages are supposed to explain that it is actually Mortimer Mouse being depicted, and not Mickey. And it also purports to tell just how Mortimer left Disney to join the gang over at Outland.

Innocent enough fun but also a bit edgier than Disney would ever be!

But being a fan of animation, comic strips, and such, I just couldn’t leave this book on the shelf once I noticed a Disney reference. And two things really made me sit up and take notice:

A credible pic of Walt Disney

I thought the artist did a great job of not only doing a great rendering of Walt himself, but also of making an image that could come from 1938.

The Earful Tower!

I just can’t get enough of this Disney Icon! I hope Disney’s Hollywood Studios starts to give this neglected wonder some of the love it deserves.

In my defense (for writing such a post) I direct your attention to an interesting article called The Blogging Food Groups: A Well-balanced Diet of Content by Jason Miller. There he postulates that a blog should have a variety of content to maintain the interest of a readership. This post would (or may) fall under the heading of a ‘condiment’ in that it contains content that provides ‘a bold statement with a strong point of view.’ Or it may be ‘meat’, but you’d have to click on the link, read the definitions, and decide for yourself.

In any event, this Outland strip caught my eye, and for what it’s worth, I present it to you.