DISNEY ON PARADE Pop Up Promotional Booklet

Disney On Parade was not a parade, nor was it on ice, but on a stage. Snow White and the Seven Dwarfs were the hosts and main stars of the show, with many Disney characters joining in on the fun.

Capital Artists Limited produced the booklet above and sold it as a souvenir at each show for HK $5.00 each. This leads me to believe that this particular engagement was performed in China, as no American price is included.

The introduction of the booklet says “Disney On Parade really began once upon a time, more than 30 years ago… it was 1937.” More than ’30 years ago’ would place the year of this show later than 1968. However, the first annual Disney On Parade show started in 1970, with a second show in 1971. This is the cover of the souvenir booklet for that show:

The three characters on this cover are in the same exact poses as the ones in the pop-up booklet of 1970.

Let’s look at the 1970 booklet. It measures approx 8″ by 11 3/4″, has a stapled binding and approximately 36 pages(not counting the cover). The cover is a light weight cardboard, the pages are a good quality gloss-paper. It is printed in full color.

A very nice pop-up variation

The book has text both in English and Chinese. The back cover is the same as the front, but entirely in Chinese. This is presumably because Chinese is read from back to front, the opposite of English. This is apparently not the case now since the advent of computers.

Here are some of the pages, featuring the acts:

The booklet concludes with a great behind the scenes section:

This two-page spread gives the lyrics for the songs used in the show. With this souvenir booklet in hand, each guest could sing along!

The lyrics were also published in the booklet in Chinese as well. Cast and crew credits are also included.

This is a great piece of Disney history, remembering a time when costumes weren’t the best, but the fun was still second to none!

Book Review: The Mickey Mouse Club Scrapbook – SSE

M – I – C (“See what’s in this post!”)

K – E – Y (“Why? Because I need the blog traffic!”)

P – L – U – G – Geeeeeeeeee!

OK, that last line had one too many capital Gs (and lots of cute little e’s), but I had to make it match the famous chant. The Mickey Mouse Club started in 1955 with many of the original Mouseketeers being on board before Disneyland was actually opened. So it was a natural cross-promotional move to have them present at the parks grand opening.

And of course, the merchandise wasn’t far behind their own television debut!

Copyrighted 1975

The original Mickey Mouse Club was long off the air by the time this Special Souvenir Edition was sold for just $2.50 (I had to pay $4.95 in 2015 at an antique shop). This may have been an attempt to restore interest in the Club before the 1977 debut of the New Mickey Mouse Club. For the new show, the concept was modernized cosmetically, with a disco re-recording of the theme song and a more ethnically diverse group of young cast members. The sets were brightly colored and simpler than the detailed black and white artwork of the original. Like the original, nearly each day’s episode included a vintage cartoon, though usually in color from the late 1930s and onward.

According to the back cover, this book was intended to be a Where-Are-They-Now expose. The book starts with acknowledgments, and an introduction of what the original club was:

It has audition photos and stories for each of the original cast members:

It then gives a review of the show segments, as follows:

  • Monday: Fun With Music Day. Mickey says – “Big doings this week!”
  • Tuesday: Guest Star Day. Mickey says – “Everybody neat and pretty?”
  • Wednesday: Anything Can Happen Day. Mickey says – “Anything goes.”
  • Thursday: Circus Day. Mickey… stammers?
  • Friday: Talent Roundup Day. Mickey says – “You all pretty nigh ready?”

Next to be featured are the serials. These include:

  • White Shadow (1955)
  • The Hardy Boys (1956)
  • Clint and Mac (1957)
  • Annette (1957)
  • The Adventures of Spin and Marty (1956-7)

What comes next is very cool:

Three more songs are featured with music sheets: Anything Can Happen Day; Here Comes the Circus!; and Talent Roundup.

Why not sing along, or better yet, sit down at your piano and play along!

Next comes The Mouseketeers Today, a great section with a head shot of the subject all grown up along with a brief blurb about their life today.

There were also 7 original Club members that the compilers of this book couldn’t find at the time of publishing:

Unfortunately, Jimmie Dodd passed away many years ago (1910-1964) but you can read all about this beautiful person at OriginalMMC.com by clicking the link.

All in all this is a wonderful keepsake with much insider information about everyone’s favorite mice!

To conclude, I just couldn’t end this post without publishing pictures of the other three song sheets included in the book. I apologize for the poor color quality in advance, but you can still enlarge them to read the lyrics or play along on your instruments:

This book was compiled by Keith Keller and published by Grosset & Dunlap of New York.

I would give this book a 5 out of 5 stars for being so full of nostalgia! Any fan of the show, Annette, or early Disney lore will love it!

Fun Fast Food Toys featuring Disney Characters

Once upon a time, in a marketing deal long long ago, two big companies decided to team up to give the world some of the greatest little toys in the history of promotional giveaways. Disney and McDonald’s restaurants no longer work together, but what they left behind still brings joy to perusers of yard sale tables and collectible shops alike!

As an example, I bring you seven Character Viewers based on Disneyland attractions and shows:

Blurry because I had a little too much grog before taking the picture

This slide shows a staged scene from a show that had live actors portraying a battle between Captain Hook and his pirates and Peter Pan. You can see a short snippet of it in this YouTube video.

King Louie as a Captain on the Jungle Cruise. Nuff said.

The Lion King Celebration was a parade based on the animated film The Lion King. It was designed to tell the story of Simba as if it were a tale passed down in Africa for generations. Its parade featured six floats designed around different aspects of Africa, dancers dressed in animal costumes and a Pride Rock float featuring Simba. The parade ran at Disneyland from June 1, 1994 to June 1, 1997, after which four of the floats were moved to Disney’s Animal Kingdom for the Festival of the Lion King show.

This slide likely shows a staged segment of the parade that wasn’t necessarily in the actual procession. This parade replaced the Aladdin’s Royal Caravan and then was itself replaced by Hercules’ Victory Parade.

Mickey and Space Mountain: Great Combination!

When I first saw Winnie the Pooh riding a train, I was expecting a slide showing the Disneyland Railroad. But instead I was treated to this great shot of The Big Thunder Mountain Railroad! So… did Pooh move from the 100-acre wood to the wildest mountain range of the old west?

The ultimate Toontown!

Now that Walt Disney World’s Toontown is gone, will Disneyland’s version soon suffer the same fate? As changes continue to come and expansion space becomes harder to find, it may be a good idea to visit this great area as soon as possible! Here is a link to Disney Dose that covers the attractions and postulates on the future of Toontown.

And now I’ve left my favorite to the last:

Splash Mountain

This slide shows the original configuration for the logs, with side-by-side seating. Interestingly, Br’er Bear seems to have thought ahead and predicted the change to a one-behind-the-other configuration. Here are Karen and I ‘enjoying’ our first plummet down the mountain:

So although we can’t go to our favorite Fast Food place and walk out with a Disney toy anymore, with the tens of thousands of Disney-related toys produced between 1988 and 2007, we can always check out eBay for those must-haves!

Check out the link for everything you didn’t want to know about the McDonald’s Happy Meal and the toys that came with them.